Visualizing Geospatial Data at Scale

Wednesday February 6, 2019 | 11:30 am PT/2:30 pm ET

What to Expect?

Geospatial data is everywhere today. Your mapping capabilities need to handle the growing volumes of “big data” to deliver location-based insights at any level. Large-scale mapping use cases require a scalable and real-time visualization platform that enables self-service analysis. End users need a fast, interactive system that can immediately display any view of their data on demand.

In this webinar, experts from Arcadia Data and Mapbox will discuss how geospatial visualizations can enable a more valuable view of your data. We will cover:

  • Techniques for visualizing large-scale geospatial data across different use cases.
  • Challenges of other mapping solutions when it comes to scale and granularity.
  • How the integrated solution of Arcadia Data and Mapbox overcomes those challenges to give your users more analytical self-service and agility.

We will also cover a demo to showcase examples of geospatial visualizations in action.

Please fill out the following:

Richard Tomlinson
Product Management
Arcadia Data

Richard currently leads Product Management for Arcadia Data with over 20 years experience in business intelligence and analytics software, data warehouse and data management platforms. His most recent work has been bringing to market new wave business analytics products on top of the Hadoop and Apache Kafka platforms. The entirety of his career has been occupied by software companies serving many roles including Product Management, Customer Services and Sales Engineering.

Chris Toomey
Sales Engineer
Mapbox

Chris focuses on building and integrating Mapbox into the next generation of business intelligence applications. Before joining Mapbox, Chris has worn many hats. He’s been a data engineer at Zillow, building real-time data visualizations; an analytics consultant at Slalom, putting data in the hands of as many people as possible; and an international nuclear policy wonk at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, saving the world one research paper at a time.